Jacksonville University publishes, in various forms, directory information such as a student’s identification photograph, name, address, telephone number, JU e-mail address, date of birth, place of birth, whether enrolled part-time or full-time, class, major, dates of attendance, degrees conferred, awards received, educational institutions attended, participation in officially recognized activities or athletic teams and weights and heights of athletic team members. In addition, grades also are considered “directory information” with regard to determining honor rolls, Dean’s lists, President’s lists, and graduation honors, all of which may be published. Transcripts of students’ academic records or student grade point averages may be released to the faculty advisor of officially recognized campus honor societies upon written request unless the student has filed an objection with the Registrar’s Office. Only faculty members and appropriate administrators have access rights to student records.

Students who do not wish to have such information released must notify the Registrar’s Office during the first two weeks of the academic year. The Registrar’s Office provides a form for the convenience of students who do not wish to have information released.

JU’s policy permits the release of information from a student’s educational record without written consent to University faculty, staff, and administration who are responsible for working with such records in registration, counseling, teaching, financial aid, tuition and fee payment, internship and other activity directly related to their official responsibilities on a “need to know” basis.​ 

As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education's FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which your education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records — including your Social Security Number, grades, or other private information — may be accessed without your consent. First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local education authorities ("Federal and State Authorities") may allow access to your records and PII without your consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any program that is "principally engaged in the provision of education," such as early childhood education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution. Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to your education records and PII without your consent to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when we object to or do not request such research. Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from the entities that they authorize to receive your PII, but the Authorities need not maintain direct control over such entities. In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without your consent PII from your education records, and they may track your participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information about you that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems.

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