MSC 101. Introduction to Marine Science (4)
Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. This course will introduce students to the broad interdisciplinary field of marine science. Physical, chemical and biological oceanography will be presented in interactive classes and laboratory exercises. Relevant topics, such as local coastal systems, tropical-temperature transitions, and environmental issues will be discussed. Field trips will explore local ecosystems.

MSC/BIOL 302. Invertebrate Zoology (4)
Cross-listed with BIOL 302. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 207; additionally, BIOL 204, 208 and 223SI are required for students with senior status. An advanced study of the invertebrate phyla with emphasis on the phylogeny, physiology, morphology and habitat of each taxonomic group. Credit cannot be awarded for both MSC 302 and BIOL 302.

MSC/BIOL 304WI. Ichthyology (4; F)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 207 and 223SI; additionally, BIOL 204 and 208 are required for students with senior status. An advanced study of fish with emphasis on the ecology, physiology, morphology and behavior of the Teleosts. Field trips are included. Formal scientific papers of research and/or laboratory results will be required with a minimum of 6,000 words.

MSC 307. Marine Geology (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in MSC 101. A basic study of the composition, structure, geologic history and surface features of the earth with emphasis on the marine portion.

MSC 308. Physical Oceanography (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in MSC 101 and MATH 110; Co-requisite: PHYS 111. A study of ocean water, air and sea interactions, currents, waves, tides and underwater sound.

MSC 310WI. Marine Ecology (4; S)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 204, 207 and 223SI; additionally, BIOL 208 is required for students with senior status. A study of the interrelationships of plants, animals and the marine environment. Formal scientific papers of laboratory results and a library research paper (minimum of 6,000 words) will be required.

MSC/BIOL 335. Marine Mammal Biology (3)
Cross-listed with BIOL 335. Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 207; additionally, BIOL 204, 208 and 223SI are required for students with senior status. Co-requisite: MSC/BIOL 336 when offered. Comprehensive study of marine mammal biology including evolution, taxonomy, anatomic and physiologic adaptations to the marine environment, population dynamics, ecological relationships, use as bio-monitors of environmental and human health, conservation and legal issues. Credit cannot be awarded for both MSC 335 and BIOL 335.

MSC/BIOL 336. Marine Mammal Biology Laboratory (1)
Cross-listed with BIOL 336. Three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 207; additionally, BIOL 204, 208 and 223SI are required for students with senior status. Co-requisite: MSC/BIOL 335. Experiential instruction in marine mammal morphology, behavior, necropsy, field techniques for biological surveys and health assessments, husbandry in captive environments. Credit cannot be awarded for both MSC 336 and BIOL 336.

MSC/BIOL 387/388/487/488. Independent Study (var. 1-6)
This course may be taken for credit more than once, but only four hours will count toward satisfying departmental degree requirements and only twelve hours will count toward satisfying university graduation requirements. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 204, 207, 208, 223SI and permission of instructor. In consultation with a faculty mentor, students will develop a research plan to explore a unique biological or marine phenomenon. Appropriate activities include, but are not limited to, literature reviews, data collection, data analysis and manuscript/presentation preparation. Students are expected to work 45 hours per credit hour per semester. Graded outcomes must include either a review paper, a formal scientific paper and/or a presentation. Departmental and College paperwork must be completed prior to registration and awarding of credit.

MSC/BIOL 390/490. Internship (var. 1-12)
This course may be taken for credit more than once, but only four hours will count toward satisfying departmental degree requirements and only twelve hours will count towards satisfying university graduation requirements. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 204, 207, 208 and 223SI, cumulative GPA equal to or greater than 2.5, and permission of instructor. In consultation with a faculty supervisor, students will select an appropriate internship setting to build upon, not replace, their university course work. Students are expected to work 45 hours per credit hour per semester. Graded outcomes include, but are not limited to, journal, paper, oral report and/or presentation. Departmental and College paperwork must be completed prior to registration and awarding of credit.

MSC/BIOL 397/398/497/498. Departmental Honors (var. 1-6)
This course may be taken for credit more than once, but only four hours will count toward satisfying departmental degree requirements. Prerequisites: Minimum of two hours from any of  BIOL 387/388/487/488, cumulative GPA equal to or greater than 3.5 and permission of instructor. In consultation with a supervisory committee composed of three faculty members, students will develop a research plan to explore a unique biological or marine phenomenon. Appropriate activities include, but are not limited to, data collection, data analysis and manuscript/presentation preparation.  Students are expected to work 45 hours per credit hour per semester. Graded outcomes must include both a formal scientific paper and presentation. Departmental and College paperwork must be completed prior to registration and awarding of credit.

MSC 406WI. Biological Oceanography (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 204 and 207; additionally, BIOL 208 and 223SI are required for students with senior status. A study of the biological nature of ocean systems. A comprehensive study of the biota of the oceans, including biogeography and natural history of marine organisms. Formal scientific review papers of research results will be required with a minimum of 6,000 words.

MSC 407WI. Marine Botany (4)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 204 and 223SI; additionally, BIOL 207 and 208 are required for students with senior status. A study of aquatic plants and their role in the oceans and estuaries. Formal scientific papers of research and/or laboratory results will be required with a minimum of 6,000 words.

MSC/BIOL  412WI. Physiological Ecology (4)
Cross-listed with BIOL 412WI. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 204, 207, 223SI and CHEM 301 or 304; additionally, BIOL 208 is required for students with senior status. An interdisciplinary approach to the interrelationship between the organism and environment, and among different taxa. Major emphasis will be placed on the physiological aspects of aquatic organisms (notably estuarine and coastal forms). Formal scientific papers of laboratory results will be required for a minimum of 6,000 words. Credit cannot be awarded for both MSC 412WI and BIOL 412WI.

MSC 420. Sea Sessions (12 or 17)
Students participating in the program during the fall or spring semesters earn 17 hours of credit that fulfills three credit hours of humanities and nine credit hours of upper division MSC requirements. The remaining five credit hours will count as upper division credit toward graduation only. Students participating in the summer sessions earn 12 credit hours; three credit hours of humanities and nine credit hours toward upper division MSC requirements. Prerequisites: BIOL 204, 207, 208 and 223SI. The course consists of enrollment in the SEA Semester program sponsored by the Sea Education Association (SEA), a nonprofit organization located at the oceanographic research community of Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The program consists of a classroom component emphasizing the theoretical foundations necessary for understanding oceanography. This includes lectures, seminars, workshops and field trips in areas of oceanography, nautical science, navigation, humanities and literature. The remaining portion of the course allows students to put their classroom knowledge to the test aboard an ocean sailing vessel. Students serve as ship’s crew and complete a research project while on the cruise. Course fee: Due to the cooperative nature of this program, students will incur additional costs to be determined including, but not limited to, tuition differential and travel.

MSC 422. Coral Reef Ecology (4)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 204 and 207; additionally BIOL 208 and 223SI are required for students with senior status. This course will offer an in-depth examination of tropical coastal communities, including coral reefs, seagrasses, mangroves, intertidal, beaches and salt ponds. Terrestrial systems also will be studied. Emphasis will be on the ecology and conservation of these systems. The course will be a combination of intensive classroom work on the JU campus and intensive field experiences. Unique aspects of Caribbean culture will be incorporated. Course fee: possible travel expenses.

MSC 430. Special Topics in Marine Science (var. 1-4)
Prerequisites: BIOL 204, 207, 208 and 223WI. This semester course may be offered on demand, covering predetermined special topics of student interest and of marine science significance, each topic to be pursued throughout the term. Lectures and discussion will be conducted by the combined efforts of staff members, visiting speakers and students.

MSC 431. Oceanographic Techniques (1)
Prerequisites: A “C-” or better in BIOL 170/170L or MSC 101 and BIOL 204, 207, 208 and 223SI or permission of instructor. This course will consist of practical experience on oceanographic instrumentation through field trips and cruises.

MSC 501. Advanced Marine Ecology (3)
Three hours lecture per week. An advanced course that examines the biological processes in oceanic and coastal waters. Emphasis is on empirical and theoretical concepts of marine ecosystem dynamics, primary and secondary production and detrital cycling.

MSC 502. Chemical Oceanography (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Examines the role of the oceans in the major global biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, nutrients, gases and trace elements. Studies include reaction rates, chemical speciation, equilibria, solubility, oxidation-reduction, absorption, complexation and their effects on the composition of seawater and the transfer of substances at the Earth's surface.

MSC 503. Geologic and Littoral Processes (3)
Three hours lecture per week. This course is a comprehensive study of the origin and development of the major structural features of the ocean basins and the continental margins. Discussion of the techniques used in obtaining geologic data and the interpretation of sedimentary processes, vulcanism, and the stratigraphy of the ocean basins.

MSC 504. Advanced Physical Oceanography (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Course is an in depth examination of the geographic and hydrodynamic aspects of oceanography, with emphasis on estuaries, along with the physical properties of seawater and theories and methods involved in ocean currents, air-sea interaction, waves and tides.

MSC 510. Graduate Seminar (1)
One hour per week. Seminar will be held on marine related topics changing each semester. Each student will be required to give at least one seminar. May be repeated for credit and will be taken on a Pass/Fail basis

MSC 520. Estuarine and Coastal Ecology (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Course will focus on estuarine ecology, including estuarine kinematics and dynamics; classification of estuaries; estuarine circulation and mixing.

MSC 530. Biology of Marine Animals (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Course will include the biology, ecology and physiology of marine animals, including invertebrates and vertebrates, with a discussion of adaptations and evolution in a marine environment.
 
MSC 540. Advanced Marine Mammal Biology (3) 
Three hours lecture per week. This course is a comprehensive study of marine mammal taxa with primary focus on cetacea and sirenia. Topics will include evolutionary history, taxonomy, anatomic and physiologic adaptations to the marine environment, population dynamics, behavioral ecology, conservation and legal issues. The role of marine mammals as biomonitors of environmental health is included.

MSC 550. Marine Microbiology (3)
Three hours lecture per week. This course focuses on the bacteria, archaea, protists and viruses that play fundamental roles in marine systems. The organisms and their processes as they relate to biogeochemical cycling, food webs, pollutants and human health will be discussed. Biodiversity and evolution, as they relate to ecological considerations will also be addressed. Peer-reviewed research and review articles will form the basis of the readings.

MSC 595. Laboratory Studies in Marine Science (3)
Three hours laboratory per week. Basic and applied techniques and research methods to understand various marine science related topics. These techniques will be learned and utilized during the course while completing an appropriate research project. May be repeated for credit when topics change, but no more than six credits count towards degree requirement.

MSC 610. Ocean & Coastal Environmental Law (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Course will examine a number of emerging ocean and coastal policy issues. Among the policy issues are those relating to oil, gas, and alternative energy facilities and equipment in coastal or ocean waters, the privatization of public waters, the impact of rising sea levels upon ocean beaches and estuarine shorelines, beach nourishment and shoreline protection, development setback lines, the use of ocean outfalls to dispose of wastewater, and the future role of the Coastal Resources Commission. Course will examine these and other emerging policy issues and the governing state and federal legal regime. 

MSC 620. Advanced Marine Botany (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Course is a survey of marine plants including phytoplanton, algae, and coastal plants. The course will focus on the ecology, diversity, and physiology of these organisms, and ways to study the different groups in the field.

MSC 630. Ocean and Coastal Observation Systems (3) 
Three hours lecture per week.  Principles of instruments used in oceanographic research, introduction to electronics, and applications of instrument measurements will be examined. Emphasis will vary from CTD profilers, current meters, radiometry and chemical measurement. Course will include introduction to using observational oceanographic data, with hands-on practice in scientific programming for data analysis.

MSC 640. Ecology of the St. Johns River (3)
Three hours lecture per week Course will examine the geologic history and ecology of the St. Johns River, both economically and environmentally, its estuaries and upland regions. From the early settlers along the St. Johns to the modern port, we’ll look back with some detail into the why’s and how’s of their impact on the St. Johns River. We will also examine how nature influenced the development of northeast Florida.

MSC 660. Experimental Design/Biostatistics (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Course will examine the mathematical methods for the analysis of biological, chemical, and physical data from the marine environment - experimental design, parametric non-parametric and re-sampling statistics. Basic design of experiments and field sampling, including random and systemic sampling, subsampling, survey techniques, single and multifactor experiments using randomized, nested, and blocked experimental designs and data analyses.

MSC 670. Advanced Aquaculture (3)
Three hours lecture per week. The course provides an introduction to the principles upon which viable aquaculture practices are based.  Different culture systems, levels of intensity and environments will be discussed. Lectures will contain background notes and information on specific topics like water quality, nutrition, disease and agri-business. Reference data, exercises and peer reviewed bibliographical sources will be provided as part of the required readings in this applied ecology course.

MSC 690. Contemporary Issues in Marine Science (var. 1-6)
One to six lecture and/or laboratory per week. Course will be on selected topics and current issues in marine science. Course can be offered on an as-needed basis for topics not included in the curriculum when faculty availability or opportunities occur. May be repeated for credit when topics change, but no more than six credits count towards degree requirement.

MSC 695. Advanced Laboratory Studies in Marine Science (3)
Three hours laboratory per week. Advanced and applied techniques and research methods to understand various marine science related topics. These techniques will be learned and utilized during the course while completing an appropriate research project. May be repeated for credit when topics change, but no more than six credits count towards degree requirement.

MSC 699. Thesis Preparation and Research (var. 1-6)
May be repeated as needed but no more than six credits count towards degree requirement.