INB 303.  Competing in the Global Environment (3; F/S)                                                                                                                             Three hours per week. This course will enable students to develop a global mindset by focusing on the dynamics of the diverse global business environment. It will help students understand the interconnection as well as the global integration of economic, socio-cultural and technological forces. Students will develop the skills necessary to design and implement global strategies, and will learn how to consider the impact of globalization on national and local business markets. This course will expose students to current theories and practices regarding international competition, and examine how to become more competitive in today's global economy.

INB/ECON 307. Comparative Economic Development (3;S)
Cross-listed with ECON 307. Three hours per week. Prerequisites: ECON 201 or consent of instructor. A study of the development and philosophy of various economies in the world, including the European Union, Russia, China, Japan, India, Latin America and Africa. Student research projects are an integral part of the course. Credit cannot be awarded for both INB 307 and ECON 307.
 
INB/MKG 341. International Marketing (3; F)
Cross listed with MKG 341. Three hours per week. Prerequisites: Junior status and MKG 301. Emphasis is given to understanding a foreign country’s culture and environment for the development of international marketing programs and to various factors that influence the exporting of domestic marketing strategies to foreign marketing environments. Current issues in cross-cultural marketing are explored. Credit cannot be awarded for both INB 341 and MKG 341.

INB/ECON 410. The Economics of Globalization (3; F)
Cross listed with ECON 410. Three hours per week. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202. A study of the issues created when economies become more global in scope. Topics include the effects of trade, trade restrictions, economic integration, international factor movements, and government policies on domestic and foreign economics. Credit cannot be awarded for both INB 410 and ECON 410.

INB/FIN 415. International Finance (3; S)
Cross listed with FIN 415. Three hours per week. Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202 and FIN 301. This course examines the international risk and return issues facing both the domestic and multinational firm. Specific topics include the determinants of exchange rates, alternative exchange rate systems, the international flow of funds, the measurement and hedging of exchange rate risk, the instruments of international trade financing, direct foreign investment, and capital budgeting for the multinational corporation. Credit cannot be awarded for both INB 415 and FIN 415.

INB 420. Global Business (3;S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisites: MGT 301 or the permission of the instructor. This course provides an overview of the evolving nature of the global business environment with special focus on the development of management skills related to international business. Topics covered include internationalization of the firm, industry globalization, international business strategy, cross-cultural management techniques, international human resources management and labor relations as well as the conduct of building of competitive capabilities and managing across the boundaries.

INB 421. Global Business Experience (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisites: Prior permission of the instructor. The Global Business Experience involves an international trip that will be a significant part of the class requirements. The purpose of this assignment is to use the whole world as a laboratory to learn about and experience with doing business and managing organizations around the world. More specifically, the students will experience the social, political, historical and other environmental elements that influence the decision-making process, business functions and the leadership styles at a variety of organizations around the globe. The objective is to provide an exceptional learning opportunity for the students to meet with professionals, experts, and the business leaders in foreign firms to observe and to discuss the current and future aspects of doing business in the global environment.

INB 555. Competing in the Global Economy (3)
This course covers the unique problems encountered in developing and operating companies in the international environment. It also treats the problems national companies encounter in interfacing with international organizations. The effect of social, cultural, economic, political, and legal institutions upon policy and strategy formulation for operating in a multinational environment is emphasized.

INB 556. Competing in the Global Marketplace (2)
Offered in the Executive MBA Program only. The whole world becomes a laboratory in this course for students to experience doing business around the world. More specifically, the students will experience the social, political, historical and other environmental elements that influence the decision-making process, business functions and the leadership styles at a variety of organizations around the globe. The Global Business Experience – a key part of this course – involves an international trip that provides an exceptional opportunity for the students to meet with professionals, experts, and the business leaders in foreign firms to discuss their current and future prospects for business in the global environment.

INB 587. Special Topics in International Business (var. 1-3)
A study of selected topics of major interest in International Business not covered in other course offerings. May be taken for credit more than once, if different topic.

INB 592Independent Studies in International Business (var. 1-3, max. 3)
A study of related International Business  topics that is closely supervised by a faculty member. Activities will normally be conducted by students out of the classroom with periodic meetings and evaluation by the faculty member who is mentoring the project. May be taken for credit more than once, but only 3 credit hours will be counted toward satisfying the degree requirements.