MATH 100. Basic College Mathematics (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. This course may not be used to satisfy the University's Core mathematics requirement. Students may not enroll in this course if they have satisfactorily completed a higher numbered MATH course. An overview of basic algebraic and geometric skills. This course is designed for students who lack the needed foundation in college level mathematics. A graphing calculator is required. 

MATH 104. College Algebra (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 100. This course may not be used to satisfy the University's Core mathematics requirement. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of linear, exponential, rational, and polynomial functions are explored using a problem solving approach. Basic modeling techniques, communication, and the use of technology is emphasized. A graphing calculator is required.

MATH 110. The Mathematics of Motion & Change (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 104. A study of the mathematics of growth, motion and change. A review of algebraic, exponential, and trigonometric functions. This course is designed as a terminal course or to prepare students for the sequence of calculus courses. A graphing calculator is required.

MATH 112. Modern Applications of Mathematics (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 104. Calculus concepts as applied to real-world problems. Topics include applications of polynomial and exponential functions and the mathematics of finance. A graphing calculator is required.

MATH 140. Calculus I (4; F, S)
Four hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 110. Rates of change, polynomial and exponential functions, models of growth. Differential calculus and its applications. Simple differential equations and initial value problems. A graphing calculator is required.

MATH 141. Calculus II (4; F, S)
Four hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 140. The definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, integral calculus and its applications. An introduction to series including Taylor series and its convergence. A graphing calculator is required.

MATH 150. Introduction to Discrete Structures (3; S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in one of MATH 110, MATH 112 or MATH 140. An introduction to the mathematics of computing. Problem solving techniques are stressed along with an algorithmic approach. Topics include representation of numbers, sets and set operations, functions and relations, arrays and matrices, Boolean algebra, propositional logic, big O and directed and undirected graphs.

MATH 199. Special Topics (var. 1-4; AR)
May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Selected topics of student interest and mathematical significance will be treated.

MATH 205. Elementary Statistics (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 104. Credit cannot be awarded for both MATH 205 and MATH 206. Organizing data, averages and variations, concepts of probability, hypothesis testing, estimation, correlation and regression. A graphing calculator is required.

MATH 206. Statistical Methods in Science (4; S)
Four hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 140. Credit cannot be awarded for both MATH 205 and MATH 206. Concepts of probability, distributions of random variables, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, ANOVA, design of experiments, testing of assumptions, scientific sampling and use of statistical software. Many examples will use real data from scientific research. A graphing calculator is required.

MATH 220WI. Mathematics & Reasoning (3; S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 103 and a "C" or better in MATH 141. Fundamentals of mathematical logic, introduction to set theory, methods of proof and mathematical writing.

MATH 300. Calculus III (4; F, S)
Four hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 141. Functions of several variables, vectors, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, non-Cartesian coordinate systems, vector fields and line integrals. A graphing calculator is required.

MATH 305. Mathematical Statistics (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 300. Probability, probability distributions, density functions, expectations, moment-generating functions, estimation and tests of hypothesis.

MATH 306. Regression & Analysis of Variance Techniques (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisites: A "C" or better in MATH 141, and a "C" or better in either MATH 205 or MATH 305. Theory of least squares, simple linear and multiple regression, regression diagnostics, analysis of variance, applications of techniques to real data and use of statistical packages.

MATH 307. College Geometry (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 141. A critical study of deductive reasoning used in Euclid’s geometry including the parallel postulate and its relation to non-Euclidean geometries.

MATH 320. Linear Algebra (3; F)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 141. Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, linear transformations, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvectors and eigenvalues and applications.

MATH / PHIL 330. Symbolic Logic (3)
Three hours per week. A study of modern formal logic, including both sentential logic and predicate logic.  This course will improve students' abilities to reason effectively.  Includes a review of topics such as proof, validity, and the structure of deductive reasoning.

MATH 331. Differential Equations (3; S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 141. Qualitative and analytic study of linear and non-linear differential equations and systems of differential equations. The modeling of real world phenomena with ordinary differential equations. Topics include separable equations, linear equations, phase plane analysis, and Laplace Transforms.

MATH 351. Applied Mathematics (3; F)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in both MATH 300 and MATH 331. Advanced calculus and differential equations methods for analyzing problems in the physical and applied sciences. Calculus topics include potentials, Green’s Theorem, Stokes’ Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem.  Differential equations topics include series solutions, special functions, and orthogonal functions.

MATH 354. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations and Modeling (3; S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in both MATH 300 and MATH 331. Modeling problems in the physical and applied sciences with partial differential equations, including the heat, potential, and wave equations. Solution methods for initial value and boundary value problems including separation of variables, Fourier analysis, and the method of characteristics. 

MATH 400SI. History of Mathematics (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 220WI and junior or senior status. This course may not be used to satisfy the University's Core mathematics requirement. A study of the history of mathematics. Students will complete and present a research paper. Students will gain experience in professional speaking.

MATH 411. Introduction to Real Analysis (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in both MATH 220WI and MATH 300. Foundations of real analysis including sequences and series, limits, continuity, and differentiability. Emphasis on the rigorous formulation and writing of proofs.

MATH 412. Introduction to Complex Variables (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in both MATH 220WI and MATH 300. Algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions, line and contour integrals, series, residues, poles and applications.

MATH 423. Algebraic Structures (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 220WI.  An overview of groups, rings, fields and integral domains. Applications of abstract algebra.

MATH 430. Reading List (2; S)
Two hours per week. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. A capstone course. Examination of significant mathematical literature. Problem solving.

MATH 440. Special Topics (var. 1-3; AR)
Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MATH 220WI or consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Selected topics of student interest and mathematical significance will be treated.

MATH 501. Introduction to Analysis (3)
Three hours per week. A study of real numbers and the important theorems of differential and integral calculus. Proofs are emphasized, and a deeper understanding of calculus is stressed. Attention is paid to calculus reform and the integrated use of technology.

MATH 502. Survey of Geometries (3)
Three hours per week. An examination of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Transformational and finite geometries.

MATH 503. Probability & Statistics (3)
Three hours per week. Probability theory and its role in decision-making, discrete and continuous random variables, hypothesis testing, estimation, simple linear regression, analysis of variance and some nonparametric tests. Attention is paid to statistics reform and the integrated use of technology.

MATH 504. Special Topics (3; AR)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Course content will vary depending on needs and interests of students.

MATH 507. Number Theory (3)
Three hours per week. An introduction to classical number theory. Topics include modular arithmetic, the Chinese Remainder Theorem, primes and primality testing, Diophantine equations, multiplicative functions and continued fractions.

MATH 508. Introduction to Mathematical Modeling (3)
Three hours per week. An introduction to mathematical modeling of real world problems. Growth models, dynamical models and difference equations, curve fitting, optimal solutions.

MATH 510. Seminar in the History of Mathematics (3)
Three hours per week. Important episodes, problems and discoveries in mathematics, with emphasis on the historical and social contexts in which they occurred.

MATH 515. Combinatorics (3)
Three hours per week. A survey of the essential techniques of combinatorics. Applications motivated by the fundamental problems of existence, enumeration and optimization.

MATH 520. Linear Algebra (3)
Three hours per week. Applications of concepts in linear algebra to problems in mathematical modeling. Linear systems, vector spaces and linear transformations. Special attention will be paid to pedagogical considerations.

MATH 531. Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations (3)
Three hours per week. Existence and uniqueness theorems. Qualitative and analytic study of ordinary differential equations, including a study of first and second order equations, first order systems and qualitative analysis of linear and nonlinear systems. Modeling of real world phenomena with ordinary differential equations.

MATH 600. Thesis Seminar (1-3)
One to three hours per week. Research guidance. May be repeated for credit up to a total of three semester hours.

MATH 699.  Thesis Preparation and Research (1)
Master of Arts in Mathematics students who have not completed their thesis and are not enrolled in any other graduate course must enroll in MATH 699 each fall and spring semester until final approval of their thesis. This course is Pass/Fail and does not count towards any graduate degree.

 

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