CHEMISTRY COURSES



CHEM 101. Introductory College Chemistry (4; F, S)
Six hours integrated lecture/laboratory per week. This course cannot be used as a prerequisite for any other chemistry course. This course is an introduction to the study of chemistry and chemical principles with emphasis on the applications of chemistry to everyday life. Topics covered include atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gases, solutions, equilibria, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry.

CHEM 103. General Chemistry I (4; F)
Six hours integrated lecture/laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in MATH 104 or placement in a core mathematics course. This course is geared towards science majors, and is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the principles associated with atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, energy of reaction, stoichiometry, and nuclear chemistry.

CHEM 104. General Chemistry II (4; S)
Six hours integrated lecture/laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in CHEM 103. This course is geared towards science majors, and is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the principles associated with the states of matter, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, spontaneity of chemical reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and electrochemistry.

CHEM 120. Urban Environmental Issues (3)
Three hours per week. A non-mathematical approach to environmental issues with emphasis on air quality, water pollution and solid waste disposal in the context of an urban environment.

CHEM 222. Analytical Chemistry (4; F)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in CHEM 104. A study of the fundamental principles and techniques associated with classical wet methods of chemical analysis. Additional topics to be examined are sampling techniques, sample preparation, experiment design and electrochemical methods of analysis.

CHEM 301. Organic Chemistry I (4; F)
Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in CHEM 104. Co-requisite: CHEM 301L. This is the first of a two-semester sequence covering the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds. The course is geared towards science majors wishing to pursue graduate or professional studies. Topics to be covered include synthesis and reactivity of: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and alcohols. Particular emphasis is placed on stereochemistry, mechanisms, and structure/reactivity effects.

CHEM 301L. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (0; F)
Three hour laboratory per week. Co-requisite: CHEM 301. This laboratory accompanies CHEM 301, and exposes students to the methods and techniques necessary to perform organic chemical reactions. Particular emphasis is placed on melting/boiling point determinations, extractions, distillations, recrystallizations, qualitative analysis via infrared spectroscopy, and one step organic reactions.

CHEM 302. Organic Chemistry II (4; S)
Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in both CHEM 301 and CHEM 301L. Co-requisite: CHEM 302L. This is the second of a two-semester sequence covering the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds. The course is geared towards science majors wishing to pursue graduate or professional studies. Topics to be covered include synthesis and reactivity of: aromatics, ethers, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids, esters, acid chlorides, anhydrides, amides, and nitriles. Particular emphasis is placed on stereochemistry, mechanisms, and synthesis.

CHEM 302L. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (0; S)
Three hour laboratory per week. Co-requisite: CHEM 302. This laboratory accompanies CHEM 302, and exposes students to historically important organic reactions necessary to perform multi-step organic synthesis. Particular emphasis is placed on the isolation of organic compounds, organic reactions, multi-step synthesis, and qualitative analysis via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

CHEM 304. Environmental Chemistry (4)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A "C" or better in CHEM 104. The objective of this course is to provide an overview of (1) important chemical parameters relating to the environment and (2) important processes that affect the fates and effects of various pollutants. Basic principles of chemical behavior and assessment will be learned by application to the following topics: principles of environmental sampling and analysis, oxygen demand, nutrient enrichment, acidity and alkalinity, complexation, toxicology, partitioning behavior, and atmospheric oxidants. Major classes of contaminants will be addressed, with emphasis on aquatic pollutants. Students will gain elementary problem-solving skills and spreadsheet abilities. The course will consist of classroom lectures, field trips, group activities, and labs. It is geared toward students with a general chemistry background who are interested in chemical aspects of environmental issues.

CHEM 306. Solving Problems in Organic Chemistry (1; F, S)
One hour lecture session per week. Pass/Fail only. Co-requisite: CHEM 301 or CHEM 302. Problem solving sessions are designed to provide guidance for students in solving organic chemistry problems. Problems are derived from the textbook, worksheets, and journals. This course may be taken more than once for a maximum of two credits.

CHEM 321. Inorganic Chemistry (4; S)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in both CHEM 301 and CHEM 301L. An advanced course that focuses on important topics from inorganic chemistry. Topics include: coordination chemistry, bonding models, application of spectroscopy, and other topics of current interest. Laboratory includes experiments that are designed to illustrate the lecture material.

CHEM 323. Instrumental Analysis (4; S)
Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in CHEM 104. A study of the theory and application of modern instrumentation methods of analysis. Emphasis will be placed on ultraviolet-visible, atomic absorption, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, gas and liquid chromatography, and solvent extraction.

CHEM 351. Advanced Experimental Chemistry (1 each; 4 max.)
Three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A “C” or better in CHEM 104 and consent of instructor. A course designed for students wishing to develop advanced laboratory techniques usually not encountered in other courses.

CHEM 401. Physical Chemistry I (4; F)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in CHEM 104, MATH 300, and PHYS 152. This course is the first part of a two-semester physical chemistry sequence. This course covers thermodynamics and kinetics. Thermodynamics focuses on the gas laws, first law, second law, and third law of thermodynamics, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, Gibb’s energy, chemical potential, and how to use these thermodynamic quantities to predict the feasibly of a chemical reaction under certain conditions. Kinetics focuses on the rate laws and reaction mechanisms.

CHEM 402. Physical Chemistry II (4; S)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in CHEM 104, MATH 300, and PHYS 152. This course is the second part of a two-semester physical chemistry sequence. This course covers quantum mechanics, atomic, molecular, and nuclear spectroscopic techniques. This course utilizes calculus based mathematical methods to characterize the quantum mechanical nature of atoms and molecules. A theoretical basis for atomic spectroscopy and a variety of molecular spectroscopy are developed by using quantum mechanical methods. The students are expected to gain a deep understanding of the atomic and various molecular spectroscopic methods, and be able to choose the appropriate method to solve specific problems.

CHEM 404. Physical Biochemistry (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in both CHEM 301 and CHEM 301L. This course is designed to expose biochemistry students to physical chemistry. This course covers thermodynamics, kinetics and various spectroscopic methods. The emphasis is focused on how to apply principles to solve physical chemistry problems in biochemical science.

CHEM 405. Special Topics in Chemistry (3)
Three hours per week. Advanced topics in chemistry not covered in other courses.

CHEM 410. Science Seminar (1 each; 2 max.)
One hour seminar per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in CHEM 104 and consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary science seminar.

CHEM 412WS. Chemistry Communication (3; S)
Three hours per week. Verbal presentation and expository writing for technical subjects. A variety of written assignments, including essays, letters, resumes, abstracts, reports and research papers, that total a minimum of 6,000 words will be required. Several oral presentations will also be required.

CHEM 425. Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology I (4; F)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in both CHEM 302 and BIOL 208 or consent of instructor. Course is cross-listed as BIOL 425. An examination of the structures and functions of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Enzyme kinetics and regulation will be discussed. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression and regulation with emphasis on the processes that make modern recombinant DNA techniques possible will be studied.

CHEM 426WI. Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology II (4; S)
Three hour lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in BIOL 425 or CHEM 425. Course is cross-listed as BIOL 426WI. A continuation of modern recombinant DNA techniques, with emphasis on genetically modified organisms and transgenic expression systems. The background from these studies and the prerequisite course will then be used to examine the mechanisms and control of cellular energy metabolism. Formal scientific papers of research and/or laboratory results will be required with a minimum of 6,000 words.

CHEM 490. Senior Project (3; S)
One hour lecture and eight hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: a minimum of 20 semester hours completed in chemistry, senior status or consent of the instructor. This course must be taken for a grade and is required of all students majoring in chemistry. Course content will include reviews of subject material by chemistry faculty, departmental assessment examinations, and an investigatory research project. The project involves experimental or theoretical research under the direction of the chemistry faculty. An internship for which the student has not previously received course credit may be substituted for the research portion of CY 490 if approved by the instructor. Each student is required to prepare a written report and an oral presentation on the research performed. The quality of the research report will be evaluated by a group of scientists from outside JU.

CHEM 495. Research Participation (var. 1-4)
This course may be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Students will participate in research directed by a member of the faculty.